MEDIA ADVISORY: Commissioner Ellis, City of Houston, Art Community Unveil UN’s First Mankind Ecosystem Restoration Mural in U.S.

MEDIA ADVISORY

Thursday, Jan. 12, 2023, 12 p.m. 

Harris County Commissioner Rodney Ellis, City of Houston Officials, Art Community to Unveil UN’s First Mankind Ecosystem Restoration Mural in U.S.

WHAT: Harris County Commissioner Rodney Ellis, City of Houston officials, and the art community will unveil the United Nations first “Mankind Ecosystem Restoration Mural” to raise awareness and trigger action for environmental protection. The 16-story mural on a downtown Holiday Inn wall will amplify the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, a global effort to reverse climate change and biodiversity loss by 2030 by creating a series of #EcosystemRestorationMurals around the world. In addition to the mural unveiling, local action will be implemented to support ecosystem restoration and tree equity in Houston:  85 trees will be planted at the White Oak Bayou Greenway devastated by Hurricane Harvey, in partnership with American Forests, Trees for Houston and Bulleit Frontier Whiskey. This will contribute to mitigate future flood risks, provide shade for hiking and biking trails and increase access to greenspaces for the neighborhood.

WHO: Harris County Commissioner Rodney Ellis
City of Houston Officials
Martin Ron, Mural Artist
Audrey and Thibault Decker, co-founders of Street Art for Mankind (SAM)  

WHEN: Thursday, Jan. 12, 12 p.m. 

WHERE: On Travis Street side of the Holiday Inn Houston Downtown, 1616 Main St., Houston, 77002


Harris County Commissioner Rodney Ellis, City of Houston officials and the art community will unveil a 16-story mural to highlight the United Nations’ Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, a global effort to reverse climate change and biodiversity loss by 2030. 

The Houston Ecosystem Restoration Mural on the Holiday Inn Houston Downtown is the first of the series in the United States. 

“The Ecosystem Restoration Mural series takes on much more specific issues of reforestation, ecosystem and wildlife protection,” Commissioner Ellis said. “These are vital components in our ongoing fight against climate change.”

The mural, created by Argentinian artist Martín Ron, highlights growing trees as a way to restore local ecosystems and their functions for people and nature. It depicts a woman’s hand holding a local live oak tree branch that she extends to us as an invitation to do our share to grow more trees. 

Trees are essential to the well-being of communities, as they help fulfill our basic needs - breathing fresh air, drinking clean water and finding relief from the heat.

“I appreciate the message in the piece that the tools to fight climate change are literally in our hands,” Commissioner Ellis said. “I think that public art should not just inspire, but also encourage the change we want to see in the world.”


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